Dawley Wesleyan Methodist chapel

Dawley Wesleyan Methodist chapel

The first Dawley Wesleyan Methodist chapel was opened on High Street in 1819, but was replaced in 1860 by a larger  Wesleyan chapel on the same site.  When the different strands of Methodism came together after 1932, this was the building they used. In time it  became known as the Central Methodist Church.

Because of fears for its structural safety, the building was demolished in the  late 1970s.  On the site now is the  Dawley Christian Centre (High St, Telford TF4 2EX).

You can see pictures and read more about the 1819 chapel and the 1860 chapel on Janice Cox’s Shropshire’s non-conformist chapels website.

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  • WELLINGTON JOURNAL, 10 March 1860, page 3.
    “DAWLEY.
    On Sunday last three sermons were preached in the Wesleyan Chapel, by the Rev. Mr. Nelson, being the last in the old chapel. The chapel, which is now being taken down was opened forty years ago by the Rev. S. Taylot, when a debt of £230 was left on it which has not been paid till now. The chapel, which is to be built on the old site, is contracted for by Mr. Bray, of Finger Lane, at an estimate of £900. The foundation is expected to be laid next Easter Monday. It is guaranteed that the whole of the money of the new chapel will be found in twelve months. Day and Sunday schools will be added to the chapel, which will be opened on the Government plan.”
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    WELLINGTON JOURNAL, 14 April 1860, page 2.
    “DAWLEY.
    LAYING THE FOUNDATION STONE OF THE NEW WESLEYAN CHAPEL. The ceremony of laying the foundation stone of the Dawley new Wesleyan Chapel took place in the presence of nearly two thousand people on Monday last. At two o’clock a procession was formed at the Music Hall, and marched to the spot in the following order:-The ministers of the circuit, and others, followed by the principal office-bearers, and the Dawley Brass Band … and the children and teachers of the Sunday School. A platform had been erected, upon which were a number of the principal members and friends in the neighbourhood … the Rev. Mr. Thomas read the following document:- The chapel, the foundation stone of which is this day laid (Easter Monday, April 9th, 1860) by Isaac Jenks, Esq., of Wolverhampton … The chapel is settled in conformity with the provisions of the Model Deed of the above named body, and is held by a number of trustees … as follows: Thomas Wordley, Dawley; Edward Smith, Ironbridge; William Poole, Willenhall, William Poole, Lawley Bank; Thomas Jones, Lawley Bank, James Harris, Dawley, William Baugh, Malinslee; J. K. Bathurst, and Benjamin Bright, who also were trustees of the former chapel … Architect [name omitted]. T. Bray, Dawley, Builder. This document, a Preacher’s Plan of the Madeley Circuit for the Current Quarter, a copy of the Watchman newspaper, the Wellington Journal, a list of subscribers to the chapel, the Bazaar Circular, and certain coins of the Realm were deposited in a bottle in a cavity beneath the foundation stone now laid, April 9th, 1860. Soli Deo Honor et Gloria. After the reading of the above document, Mr. G. Bailey, as representative of the trustees, presented to Isaac Jenks, Esq., a beautiful silver trowel, and a mahogany mallet, to perform the ceremony of laying the stone … The Rev. Mr. Naylor, then addressed the meeting and said he had been a preacher in the Wesleyan body for sixty years, and he could congratulate the trustees that they had begun to raise such a beautiful house to the Lord, and he could say in the language of Watts –
    ‘These temples of His grace
    How beautiful they stand
    The honour of our native place
    The bulwarks of the land.’
    … A collection was then made and the sum of £65, including £25 given by Mr. Jenks, realised … At five o’clock a public tea meeting was held in the Music hall … [there follows a long list of those who contributed financially to the fund] … .”
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    EDDOWES’S JOURNAL, 18 April 1860, page 6.
    “DAWLEY.
    LAYING OF THE GOUNDATION STONE OF THE NEW CHAPEL … The building, it is supposed, will cost £1000, and between £600 and £700 had already been collected.”
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    By Janice Cox (05/01/2021)

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