Market Rasen Wesleyan Chapel, Lincolnshire

D Secker
Main entrance
D Secker
Sunday school annex of 1891
D Secker

This Grade II* listed building, known as the Centenary Methodist Church, remains open for services and events.

Few small-town chapels are more impressive or breathtaking than this one. Built in 1862/3 on Chapel Street, it has (or had) seating for 750.

Of it, Pevsner wrote: “By W Botterill of Hull. Stone and red brick with a tetrastyle Ionic portico and pediment. Six-bay sides with two tiers of windows. Inside, the original box pews, oval gallery and double-decker pulpit.”

The measurements given at the time of construction were: 75ft long; 44ft breadth; and 35ft from floor to ceiling. The cost was approx £4,000. Included were Sunday schoolrooms on the ground and first floors. It replaced a smaller chapel of 1838 on the same site, this in turn replacing one of 1800 on Jameson Bridge Street which was later acquired by the Primitive Methodists.

The opening took place on Thursday 4th June 1863 with sermons by the Rev Gervase Smith of London a future President of the Wesleyan Conference.

A Sunday school cum hall extension by Messrs Wright & Son, costing in the region of £260, was added onto the south-east side of the chapel in 1891.

It is said that a Wesleyan day school functioned from 1850 to 1853. In 1871 the chapel was petitioning for subscriptions towards building another school. Fronting Mill Lane and of generous proportions, it opened in January 1872 and was transferred to the local authority in 1930 see Topics/Education on this site for photo and more information.

Circuits: Market Rasen Wesleyan; Market Rasen (Chapel Street) Methodist 1932 only; Market Rasen & Caistor from 1933 following amalgamation of the two circuits; and Wolds & Trent in more recent times.

Sources include

Buildings of England (Lincolnshire) Pevsner N.

Louth & North Lincolnshire Advertiser 03/07/1863

RASE Heritage Society, Market Rasen

Methodist Church Buildings: Statistical Returns July 1940

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